World Shooting Championship to Crown Undisputed World Shooting Champion

The 1st Annual Trijicon / NRA World Shooting Championship will be held at the Peacemaker National Training Center in Glengary, WV and will crown “The World Shooting Champion“.

The NRA’s Competitive Shooting Division will manage and score the match with the assistance of the Peacemaker National Training Center match staff. The overall objective of this match is to assemble the top 400 shooters from around the world to include existing and previous champion shooters from virtually every organized shooting sport worldwide and crown one competitor, The Undisputed World Shooting Champion, a distinction never been bestowed upon any shooter in history.

All shooters will compete over the course of four days in twelve equally weighted, officially sanctioned disciplines from various shooting sports. All firearms and ammunition will be provided for each event thus shooters will compete with common firearms and ammunition. This will level the playing field, as specialized equipment for each discipline will be provided for all competitors. This will also alleviate the need for new equipment to be purchased for unfamiliar events; and assist with international and domestic travel for all competitors.

Match Information & Key Dates:
Match Dates: September 10-13 2014
Location: Peacemaker National Training Center Glengary WV
Contact: info@peacemakernational.com, 304-229-GUNS (4867)

Match Rules:
Scoring is commonized so that all stages have the same overall value. Official rules available soon.

Match Stages:
Segment has three stages. Shooters may or may not shoot all stages of the match. Not shooting a certain stage will decrease the overall match score but NOT PROHIBIT a shooter from winning individual stages or a segment or segments.

Firearms & Ammunition Are Provided:
Shooters will not bring or use their firearms in this match. All firearms and ammunition are appropriate for the courses of fire and will be provided.

Registration Requirements:
Initial invitations to champion shooters around the world were sent out February 26 2014. By mid March open registration will be available. 400 shooters total will compete. For consideration for a champion invitation send championships won & outline of shooting credentials to: info@peacemakernational.com

Match Director: Larry Houck – PNTC
Match Executive & Coordinator: Cole McCulloch – PNTC
Match Administrator: Tom Pohuski – PNTC
Trijicon Match Executive: Jeff Eby – Trijicon
Rifle Segment Director: Sheri Judd – NRA
Pistol Segment Director: Damien Orsinger – NRA
Shotgun Segment Director: To Be Announced – NRA
Combined Segment Director: Nathan Judd – NRA

Awards:

First Place: $50,000
Lady Champion: $5,000
Pistol Segment Winner: $5,000
Rifle Segment Winner: $5,000
Shotgun Segment Winner: $5,000
Combined Firearms Segment Winner: $5,000
Second Place Overall: $3,000
Third Place Overall: $2,000
Fourth Place Overall: $1,000
Stage Winner $2,000
Side Match Winner: $1,000
Over $150,000 In Prize Table Awards

Match Segments & Stages:

Pistol Segment: Overall three stage winner (World Pistol Champion Trophy & 5K Cash)

Stage One: NRA Action Pistol Bianchi Cup Mover
Stage Two: USPSA
Stage Three: NRA Conventional Pistol Bullseye

Side Match One: IDPA Challenge
Side Match Two: SASS Bullseye

Rifle Segment: Overall three stage winner (World Rifle Champion Trophy & 5K Cash)

Stage Four: NRA National Defense Match
Stage Five: F-Class 600 Yards
Stage Six: NRA Smallbore Standing

Side Match Three: NRA Bianchi Plate Rack
Side Match Four: AR X Ring Bullseye

Shotgun Segment: Overall three stage winner (World Shotgun Champion Trophy & 5K Cash)

Stage Seven: NSCA Sporting Clays – 5 Stand
Stage Eight: ATA Trap
Stage Nine: NRA Law Enforcement Shotgun

Side Match Five: Tactical Shotgun
Side Match Six: Turkey Shoot

Combined Segment: Overall three stage winner (World Combined Sport Champion Trophy & 5K Cash)

Stage Ten: 3Gun
Stage Eleven: SASS 3Gun
Stage Twelve: PNTC Long Range 2Gun

Side Match Seven: Top Of The World Long Range Challenge
Side Match Eight: Long Range Pistol Challenge

Media & Press Contact
Please direct all media inquiries to
Mr. Jeremy Green
NRA Director of Media Relations
11250 Waples Mill Rd, Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 267-1000
JGreene@nrahq.org

Match and/or Sponorship Information
Alisha Redding
PNTC WSC Coordinator
1624 Brannons Ford Rd
Gerrardstown WV 25420
alisha@peacemakernational.com

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2014 All Army Small Arms Championship

FORT BENNING, Ga. – More than 200 Soldiers from around the force competed against each other and Mother Nature at the history-making 2014 U.S. Army Small Arms Championship.

Snow, ice and bone-chilling weather, combined with the highest female participation in two decades and the crowning of a five-time champ, made this year’s iteration of the Army’s premier marksmanship training event one to remember for years to come.

“It was interesting,” said Master Sgt. Russell Moore “It was great combat weather. It wasn’t anything our Soldiers aren’t facing around the world. It definitely affected things and you had to plan accordingly. I think it brought out the warrior in everybody.”

Cementing his legacy within the lore of the “All-Army,” Moore won the overall individual championship for a historic fifth time. The Army Reservist and Dept. of Army civilian from Boerne, Texas, edged out fellow Army Reservist Sgt. 1st Class John Buol in a close battle that came down to the final match.

“It was very close and we didn’t know who won until they announced it at the awards ceremony,” Moore said. “This one feels good because there were some phenomenal shooters this year.”

Moore spends his weekdays instructing combat medics at the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He follows that up on the weekends as a ROTC instructor at the University of Texas at San Antonio with the 4-414th Regiment (SROTC) and said he takes the valuable lessons back to the classroom.

“I’ve been very happy to take what I learned here and other matches and, whether it’s my students or my cadets, to (explain to them) just how important individual marksmanship truly is to the Army.”

Hosted by the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, active duty, Army Reserve and National Guard Soldiers were split into four main categories: pro, open, novice and cadet. Winners received plaques and coins, and their names were permanently engraved on trophies. Moore and the overall high novice shooter for the week, Capt. Nicholas Brunnet, were awarded a Secretary of the Army M1 Garand Trophy Rifle for their accomplishment. Team California won the overall team championship.

Snow and ice pelted Fort Benning on the second day of the event, leading to the post closing for a day and-a-half. USAMU personnel scrambled to adjust the schedule so the Soldiers who attended would still receive enough training to accomplish the general mission of the event.

“The All-Army is designed to be the ultimate train-the-trainer event for marksmanship,” said Lt. Col. Don King Jr, commander, USAMU. “We task these Soldiers to take what they learned this week and take it back to their units to increase the overall combat readiness of our Army.”

Among the many highlights of the event was the increased participation of female Soldiers. Over the past decade of war, women have contributed in unprecedented ways to the Army’s mission and have proven their ability to serve in an expanding number of roles. Those who attended this year’s competition hope it opens the floodgates for more female attendance for years to come.

“This is my first All-Army but won’t be my last,” said Army Reservist Sgt. 1st Class Annette Habel, an Army Career Counselor hailing from Clairmont, Fla. “This has been so much fun, and I have met so many great people. I volunteered to come compete and am really glad I did.

The (combat pistol) team match was Habel’s favorite part of the event, she said. They had to cross the finish line together and shoot together and that’s what the Army teaches, to work as a team.

“I foresee that we’re going to have more females come out next year and give the guys more competition,” she added.

This championship allows Soldiers to test their marksmanship proficiency in challenging circumstances without the actual rigors of war so that when they are deployed they have the confidence and resources to win those battles, King said. The All-Army is really a training event cleverly disguised as a competition.

“I keep coming back because it is not only an opportunity not to meet and interact with other Soldiers from the guard, active (duty) and reserve,” Moore said. “It allows me to pass on what we have learned over the years and teach it to novices, especially, to the cadets — our future leaders — and the other Soldiers who compete.”

http://www.theoutdoorwire.com/story/1391586125gsj3eyhzuph

Priorities for Research to Reduce the Threat of Firearm-Related Violence

Committee on Priorities for a Public Health Research Agenda to Reduce the Threat of Firearm-Related Violence

Executive Office
Institute of Medicine

Committee on Law and Justice
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

Edited by Alan I. Leshner, Bruce M. Altevogt, Arlene F. Lee, Margaret A. McCoy, and Patrick W. Kelley

Institute of Medicine and National Research Council of the National Academies
THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, D.C.

A few of the findings in this report, as written up by Kyle Wintersteen

1. Armed citizens are less likely to be injured by an attacker:
“Studies that directly assessed the effect of actual defensive uses of guns (i.e., incidents in which a gun was ‘used’ by the crime victim in the sense of attacking or threatening an offender) have found consistently lower injury rates among gun-using crime victims compared with victims who used other self-protective strategies.”

2. Defensive uses of guns are common:
“Almost all national survey estimates indicate that defensive gun uses by victims are at least as common as offensive uses by criminals, with estimates of annual uses ranging from about 500,000 to more than 3 million per year…in the context of about 300,000 violent crimes involving firearms in 2008.”

3. Mass shootings and accidental firearm deaths account for a small fraction of gun-related deaths, and both are declining:
“The number of public mass shootings of the type that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School accounted for a very small fraction of all firearm-related deaths. Since 1983 there have been 78 events in which 4 or more individuals were killed by a single perpetrator in 1 day in the United States, resulting in 547 victims and 476 injured persons.” The report also notes, “Unintentional firearm-related deaths have steadily declined during the past century. The number of unintentional deaths due to firearm-related incidents accounted for less than 1 percent of all unintentional fatalities in 2010.”

4. “Interventions” (i.e, gun control) such as background checks, so-called assault rifle bans and gun-free zones produce “mixed” results:
“Whether gun restrictions reduce firearm-related violence is an unresolved issue.” The report could not conclude whether “passage of right-to-carry laws decrease or increase violence crime.”

5. Gun buyback/turn-in programs are “ineffective” in reducing crime:
“There is empirical evidence that gun turn in programs are ineffective, as noted in the 2005 NRC study Firearms and Violence: A Critical Review. For example, in 2009, an estimated 310 million guns were available to civilians in the United States (Krouse, 2012), but gun buy-back programs typically recover less than 1,000 guns (NRC, 2005). On the local level, buy-backs may increase awareness of firearm violence. However, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for example, guns recovered in the buy-back were not the same guns as those most often used in homicides and suicides (Kuhn et al., 2002).”

6. Stolen guns and retail/gun show purchases account for very little crime:
“More recent prisoner surveys suggest that stolen guns account for only a small percentage of guns used by convicted criminals. … According to a 1997 survey of inmates, approximately 70 percent of the guns used or possess by criminals at the time of their arrest came from family or friends, drug dealers, street purchases, or the underground market.”

7. The vast majority of gun-related deaths are not homicides, but suicides:
“Between the years 2000-2010 firearm-related suicides significantly outnumbered homicides for all age groups, annually accounting for 61 percent of the more than 335,600 people who died from firearms related violence in the United States.”

Three Generations Of S&W Semiautomatics

Solid semiautomatic handguns as made by the premier revolver maker.

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