The Seecamp Conversion

Louis Seecamp was a 1911 fan and advocate of double actions for carry. Here’s how to work common problems with his conversion.

by RK Campbell

An unusual handgun crossed my path a few months ago. Frankly, I was very interested to see this firearm as I had not seen it’s like in many years. The Omega Defensive Industries Viking Combat pistol is typical to many of the 1911 handguns emerging in the 1980s. ODI, Randall, Auto Ordnance, and others tried to carve out a niche for themselves, however, only Springfield survives in its original company organization. These handguns often used cast frames and slides, often built as cheaply as possible. This particular ODI arrived with a list of complaints but some of the problems were the result of honest wear rather than a poor design. It wasn’t a safe queen as this handgun had been used long and steadily. It showed signs of being cleaned and maintained but also of hard use.

The ODI illustrated featured a cast stainless slide and frame that appeared to have been supplied by Essex. It is a Commander-length handgun with a 4.25 inch barrel, rowel-type hammer, extended beavertail safety, and nice rubber Hogue grips. The pistol features a full-length guide rod and adjustable sights. The Bomar-like sights are high quality and stamped “STI International.” The beavertail is well designed. The biggest difference between this handgun and other 1911 handguns – and what a difference it is – is being fitted with a Seecamp double action conversion.

At American Gunsmith we write topically instead of historically but sometimes a bit of background is in order. Ludwig (Louis) Wilhelm Seecamp was a…

Read more in the October 2018 issue.

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