Beretta M9 Service Handgun Inspection

The Beretta M9 has proven its worth for both service members and civilians alike. Taking the time to give it a proper inspection will keep it functioning to standard.

by Steph Martz

The M9 has been serving our United States military since 1985, formally adopting the Beretta 92 SB-F as Pistol, Semiautomatic, 9mm, M9. Nearly four decades later, it is still a reliable handgun when taken care of. So many are quick to judge the pistol for reasoning of, “it’s past its prime, they constantly break, stick with the 1911, etc.”. When dealing with firearms that have been in service a long time, like anything, there will be parts that have finally met their life span.

When going after the contract in the 1980s, this service pistol met all criteria and beat out many other reputable companies such as Smith & Wesson, Heckler and Koch, and Walther. Mind you, Beretta won it twice due to allegations that the first test was done under bias. The Beretta showed its durability during testing by lasting through severe temperature change, water, sand, mud, and snow testing, drop tests, and the often-popular mean rounds before failure (MRBF). The Beretta showed a MRBF of 35,000 rounds; the criteria was to get through 5,000 rounds before failure. The testing criteria that these pistols go through when attempting to be chosen as a new service pistol is truly remarkable. Testing goes so far as measuring the indent of the firing pin on the primers throughout testing. Durability, accuracy, and reliability all go into criteria to be passed.

When an issue is found with the winning pistol it is then determined by the branch of service how to…

Read more in the June 2021 issue.

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